“An Ideal Day Makes an Ideal Life”

“An Ideal Day Makes an Ideal Life” In the corporate world if 60% of your time is spent doing what you love to do and what you are really good at, then you are in ‘ideal space’. My good friend Jack Higgins, a corporate coach, teaches his clients to spend 80% of their time doing what matters most to them. Doing what you are good at and what you love to do enhances your chance of success and enhances your identity. Conversely, if you are controlled by someone else, in time you lose your identity. Of course no one can control everything that happens to them in work or in life, but the more ideal our days, the more ideal our life. Pretty straightforward. Most of us start out just trying to make a living. Our idea of success changes as we gain experience and knowledge. For me, success when I was in high school was pitching a winning game. success was getting a job to save for college. Success later was getting into dental school; then graduating from dental school; then gaining more knowledge and education while I was in the Navy; then starting my practice; and raising my...

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7 Questions Every Great Leader Needs to Answer

Far too often, leader/managers of dental practices get trapped into thinking that if they focus on the day-to-day operation of the practice – the processes, procedures, and systems – they are in total control of management issues. This is particularly true for group practices that, as a matter of efficiency, must utilize processes, procedures, and systems to manage the complexities of multiple offices and partners as well as large numbers of patients and staff. Efficiency, however, should not be confused with effectiveness. Many times, leader/managers remain stuck on simply fine-tuning the systems until a recurrence of problems signals that management issues go beyond day-to-day operations. The symptoms can be as clear as a high level of stress, bickering among staff, and an increase in human resource costs; they can also be as oblique as decreased communication and erosion of the patient relationships. How can a practice make the jump to effectiveness and prevention of these problems – the elimination of chaos? The process begins when leader/managers of the practice begin to think through the seven key concepts critical to any organization, then answer the associated questions and communicate the answers to everyone associated with the practice – each member of...

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Achieve Peak Profit, Reduce Stress and Deliver High Quality Dentistry

Many dentists believe that if they just increase the number of patients seen they will have financial success. Dentists have been told that bigger practices will produce more money for them. But, this production model assumes that the dentist’s fixed costs are indeed “fixed” and quality time spent with patients will not become a problem. Fixed costs aren’t really fixed, just constant. Dentists soon realize that they must add staff, increase office space, or keep more materials on hand to handle a larger practice. But when fixed costs increase, the overhead percentage increases and net profit decreases. Most dentists are not aware that their introduction to marketing and management of their practice was influenced by research of manufacturing. This manufacturing/production model  doesn’t apply to dentistry or other service industries. Those dentists who believed in this model now find themselves spending more time managing the business side of the practice and less time with their patients. As the pressure increases to produce more business, neglected patients go to another dentist who cares about them. Eventually, dentists realize that they can’t produce their way out of the “bigger is better” trap. What do they do then? Some dentists sell their businesses to...

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